The Link Between Music and Math

By: Nigel Joneston

The patterns that exist between math, language, and music have prompted numerous studies to be commissioned to establish their inter- relationship. We all know that music is a series of notes that are played in accordance to a pattern and maths too works in a similar way. In maths to result always remains finite despite the various ways in which you can add, multiply, subtract, and divide numbers.

The same is true of music. Notes are combined in a series of groupings (almost and endless variety) but the number of sounds created is finite. It is patterns and combinations such as this that make music and math similar. Our brain seems to process the information from music and math in a different manner than it computes other information.

Babies are first attracted to speech when it sounds rhythmic and melodic. Parents instinctively know to talk to a baby in a tone that has melodic and bold sounding words throughout, rather than using a normal voice. You will probably notice that the baby pays more attention to you when you speak to them in a poetic, mathematical stride to them rather than when your words are mundane and spoken in a normal tone of voice.

Small children love to listen to music that with repetitive patterns to it. Perhaps this is because their brain is computing the music message in way that catches their interest and makes them think. Hopefully, as a result children learning different methods to think, they are more willing to learn and absorb.

Give a child anything in their hand and they start creating musical patterns and rhythms. Al the music they make has a definitive pattern and beat. Children have the unique capability to create patterns out of random sounds. How well they create music and how tuned they are establishes the mathematical powers of the child that evolve later in their adult lives.

Various studies have shown that children who participate in musical activities, whether playing an instrument or listening to a variety of music, do better in math. Therefore, for a growing child it is important to have music as a part of their life and routine. They develop into people who are better at maths as their brains have been exercised and sharpened to discern patterns and repetition among the musical notes.

Math is essentially the following of known patterns to arrive at a conclusion. Once you know that formula to find the answer, such as the simple formula of addition or the more complex formula of determining the degrees of an angle, you'll be able to use that pattern to get that answer.

The connection between music and math works both ways: those children who do well in math class are also extremely successful when it comes to playing an instrument and reading musical notes. The combination of both these skills can lead to better overall performance in school.

The study of music has many benefits that include the learning of language to improving math skills. Incorporating music into our lives from birth onwards give an advantage that can't be disputed as more and more studies confirm the connection between music and math.

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About the Author:

Nigel Joneston is the owner of For Very Good Music, the web's premier resource for information about music. For more articles on music visit: www.fvgmusic.com/articles Article Source: http://www.emusicguides.com

 


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